the Fonts we take
   it aren't the Fonts we take; it's what's inside of us that makes us turn out the way we do...
About Avenir font family Avenir font family

Adrian Frutiger designed Avenir in 1988, after years of having an interest in sans serif typefaces. In an interview with Linotype, he said he felt an obligation to design a linear sans in the tradition of Erbar and Futura, but to also make use of the experience and stylistic developments of the twentieth century.

The word Avenir means “future” in French and hints that the typeface owes some of its interpretation to Futura. But unlike Futura , Avenir is not purely geometric; it has vertical strokes that are thicker than the horizontals, an “o” that is not a perfect circle, and shortened ascenders. These nuances aid in legibility and give Avenir a harmonious and sensible appearance for both texts and headlines.

About Avenir Next Pro font family Avenir Next Pro Family

In 2004, Frutiger, together with Linotype in-house type designer Akira Kobayashi, reworked the Avenir family to address on-screen display issues. The result was titled Avenir Next. The typeface family was increased to 24 fonts: 6 weights, each with a roman and italic version, in 2 widths: normal and condensed. Frutiger’s numbering system was abandoned in favor of more conventional weight names. The glyph set was expanded to include small caps, old style figures, subscripts and superscripts, ligatures.

About Helvetica Neue font family Helvetica Neue font family

This typeface, designed by Max Miedinger and other project members at the Haas’sche Schriftgiesserei, has become one of the most famous and popular typefaces in the world, thanks to the marketing strategy of Stempel and Linotype. It forms an integral part of many printers and operating systems. The original letterforms of Helvetica had to be modified for the Linotype system. Over the years, Helvetica was expanded to include many different weights, but these were not coordinated with each other.

The Neue Helvetica sets new standards in terms of its form and number of variants. It is the quintessential sans serif font, timeless and neutral, and can be used for all types of communication.

About Univers font family Univers font family

Univers was designed by Adrian Frutiger on Swiss principles for Charles Peignot at Deberny & Peignot.

Frutiger imposed strict discipline across all elements of the series, from light to dark, extra condensed to extended, a concordance of design that was possible in the foundry type and photocomposition fonts. Any version may be mixed within a word with any other. It may be argued that the design of the most popular central series is limited by strict conformity to little used extremes. If Helvetica gives us the strongest central designs at some sacrifice in uniformity across the series, Univers gives us a uniform series by disciplining the central designs.

About Proxima Nova font family Proxima Nova font family

The Proxima Nova family is a complete reworking of Proxima Sans (1994). The original six fonts (three weights with italics) have been expanded to 42 full-featured OpenType fonts. There are three widths: Proxima Nova, Proxima Nova Condensed, and Proxima Nova Extra Condensed. Each width consists of 14 fonts--seven weights with matching italics.

Stylistically, Proxima Nova straddles the gap between typefaces like Futura and Akzidenz Grotesk. The result is a hybrid combining humanistic proportions with a somewhat geometric appearance.

About Interstate font family Interstate Font family

Familiarity lies at the heart of legibility. Interstate is based on the signage alphabets of the U.S. Federal Highway Administration, letterforms absorbed at a glance everywhere we drive.

Interstate provides a real edge in swift communication.

Among other uses, Interstate is recommended for Newspaper, Magazine, Book, and Corporate use.

About Din Next Font Din Next font family

DIN Next is a typeface family inspired by the classic industrial German engineering designs, DIN 1451 Engschrift and Mittelschrift. Akira Kobayashi began by revising these two faces-who names just mean "condensed" and "regular"-before expanding them into a new family with seven weights (Light to Black). Each weight ships in three varieties: Regular, Italic, and Condensed, bringing the total number of fonts in the DIN Next family to 21.

In 1936 the German Standard Committee settled upon DIN 1451 as the standard font for the areas of technology, traffic, administration and business.

About Benton Sans font Benton Sans Font Family

In 1903 faced with the welter of sans offered by ATF, Morris Fuller Benton designed News Gothic, a 20th Century standard.

In 1995 Tobias Frere-Jones studied drawings in the Smithsonian and started a redesign. Cyrus Highsmith reviewed News Gothic, and with the Font Bureau studio expanded it into Benton Sans, a far reaching new series, with matched weights, widths and performance well beyond the limits of the original.

Among other uses, Benton Sans is recommended for Newspaper, Magazine, Book and Corporate use.

About Neo Sans font Neo Sans font family

Neo Sans began as an intriguing assignment from a branding agency. The agency’s client wanted an “ultra modern” type family that was "futuristic without being gimmicky or ephemeral.” When a bureaucratic decision cancelled the project, Monotype staff designer Sebastian Lester decided to finish the design on his own. “I was left with a sketchbook full of ideas,” he said, “and thought it would be a shame not to see what came of them.”

Lester decided that the principal ingredient of an “ultra modern” typeface was simplicity of character structure: a carefully drawn, monoline form, open letter shapes and smooth, strong curves. By further amplifying these qualities, he crossed the line from modern to futuristic.

Museo Sans font family

Museo Sans is based on the well-known Museo.

It is a sturdy, low contrast, geometric, highly legible sans serif typeface very well suited for any display and text use.

This OpenType font family offers also support for CE languages and even Esperanto. Besides ligatures, automatic fractions, proportional/tabular lining and old-style figures, numerators, denominators, superiors and inferiors MUSEO also has a ‘case’ feature for case sensitive forms.

# A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z